The Blog About Nothing 6/12 Edition

Logo BANWhat up world! Welcome to another edition of The Blog About Nothing. The hardest thing about writing a weekly blog is finding out a topic, or topics you want to blog about. You see, it’s easy to pick a topic. It’s harder to actually put an opinion to it. However, I want to throw my two cents on an individual that has made the news this morning for calling herself something she’s not. The thing is I don’t want to shame her. It’s not my place. However, something in me feels the need to address it. So here we go. Lets do this!

I am talking about the curious case of Rachel Dolezal. If you are unaware Ms. Dolezal is the President of the Spokane, Washington chapter of the NAACP. She is also an adjunct professor of Africana Studies at Eastern Washington University. Ms. Dolezal is a voice in the African-American community in her City. She should be commended for taking on the role as a President in the NAACP, except for one thing: she is not black. She is ethnically not belonging to a minority race, or a “colored person”. Ms. Dolezal has become a national story because her family has recently outed her for not being what she claims to be: a black woman.

Ms. Dolezal is biologically white. According to her family she is of German and Czech roots. There may also be a trace of Native American in her blood. However, her family adopted several black children and at some point in her life Rachel started to identify as a black woman. She started to represent herself as a black woman, and it is claimed that she posted a picture on her Facebook page of an older black man calling that man her father. He is not.

IRachel Dolezal 2f you were to see a picture of Ms. Dolezal you would see that she appears to be light skinned. She looks African-American to be honest. She has braids in her hair, married to a black man, and honestly if it wasn’t for this “controversy” she’d live a comfortable life as a black woman. That’s why I don’t understand why this is a news story.

Who cares how Ms. Dolezal wants to live? If this is a country that for the most part is going out of their way to accept Caitlyn Jenner, then why should we give a damn if Rachel Dolezal is a white woman who wants to be black? Can’t we not be whatever the hell we damn please in the United States of America (tongue in cheek sarcasm be noted)?

I’ll admit that I think her impact in the community would have been more respected if she didn’t deceive the same people she represents. If she approached the black community in her area of Washington state as a white woman who was sympathetic to the black cause she would have a greater impact. By being deceitful of her ethnic roots she’ll likely have to resign from her office and her position as an adjunct professor, but if Rachel wants to be a black woman then I for one welcome her to the diaspora. Look, any voice that can help advance the community instead of weakening it would be greatfully accepted.

Rachel DolezalPlus how many people from another race would want to call themselves black anyway? As Chris Rock once joked: if Bill Gates woke up one day with Oprah Winfrey money, he’d jump out of a window and split his wrists while falling. While that joke wasn’t necessarily about the misappropriation of race, it tied into a commentary that he was making that many whites don’t necessarily want to trade places with blacks in America. So to have a white woman who actually wants to be black and represent African-Americans should be applauded. Not shamed.

I needed to get that off my chest. It’s a short blog, and usually I prefer discussing lighter topics, but after reading a few articles about Ms. Dolezal and listening to the topic on a few radio programs that I like, I just felt the need to put my words out there.

I’m done. Thanks for reading. Thanks for supporting www.7poundbag.com.

Peace.

 

 

Tiny URL for this post:
 

Comments

comments

About Earl (EJ) Brewster 284 Articles
Born, raised, and still reside in Brooklyn, New York. I'm in my mid 30's, and I love sports, music, politics, and blogging about real life. You can find me on Twitter at @EJ_Brooklyn_Own

7 Comments

  1. EJ,

    “Right on” as we used to say back in the 60’s.

    There is another dimension which might be relevant here. I don’t know enough about the situation to answer my question, but suppose that Ms. Dolezal considers herself as (ethnically) black? Given her membership in mostly black families and in mostly black social environments, this is a real possibility. Do you believe that if she feels that way, she should have to announce her white parentage to be honest with her colleagues — and presumably with herself?

    I agree completely with the main point you make, and that is this isn’t (or perhaps I should say “shouldn’t be”) newsworthy.

  2. Ms. Dolezal has been defending herself on Twitter. She says she was one of many who were born in the wrong skin and those attacking her are being racist. Apparently there is something called trans-racial.

    She clearly has decided that she is black and she has decided to openly go after all those who are going after her today.

  3. If I were in her shoes I’d admit my white privilege just to put all the cards out there. She clearly is more than her race but she should acknowledge what her parents are alledging.

    To be elected a chapter president of the NAACP she has to be an exceptional and in touch person but she is being deceitful here.

  4. EJ,

    I don’t want to beat a dead horse here. I am a little surprised at the reaction to someone who identifies as culturally black even though genetically white. It is not that I challenge either the claim or the reaction, but only that I would like to understand both more fully. In particular, I would appreciate it if you could explain what it is you find “deceitful” here.

    I have a suspicion that I am missing something important here and would like to know what.

    Thanks.

  5. What I find deceitful is the lying. The black father, the adopted brother being passed off as a son. While I get the need for her to create this whole “i’m black” backstory I’m not so happy with how she’s gone about it.

    I wrote this on Friday. Now that it’s Tuesday, I feel like she’s going too far with this. She can identify as a black woman all she wants, but I can’t help but think she should just admit that she’s biologically white but empathizes with the black experience so much that she adopted this trans racial identity. Instead of being so aggressive in trying to define her “blackness” she might be better off soft peddling at this point and just be upfront with everything.

  6. EJ,

    Thanks. Your reply helps. I feel I have a somewhat better understanding of why the reaction came down the way it did. I either missed or ignored the “black father” and “adopted brother as son” parts.

  7. No problem Appleseed. I didn’t get a chance to see her interview on the Today Show but she seems like she’s going to remain defiant. So unless the public conciousness moves on, we’ll be hearing more from Rachel. Shoot, I might blog about her again this Friday. I’m starting to change my mind on her.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*